Retirement

Retirement strategies >>

Julius Giarmarco
ING, DING and NING trusts
Article posted by Julius Giarmarco
An ING trust is short for “incomplete non-grantor trust”; a NING trust is short for “Nevada incomplete non-grantor trust”, and a DING trust is short for “Delaware incomplete non-grantor trust.” These are trusts where a grantor residing in a high-income tax state transfers income-generating or appreciating assets to an irrevocable non-grantor trust in a state that will not subject the trust’s income and capital gains to state income taxes (like Nevada and Delaware). In the typical ING, the grantor is a beneficiary of the trust.

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Investments >>

Jared Trexler
IRS regulations create new type of retirement income annuity: The QLAC
Article posted by Jared Trexler
On July 1, 2014, the IRS released the final regulations for qualifying longevity annuity contracts. Thanks to these regulations, you will now be able to purchase certain annuity contracts that can be excluded from the fair market value you use to calculate your required minimum distribution (RMD).

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Retirement plans >>

kstartt
Is your income bucket plan an inflation trap?
Article posted by Kevin Startt
In the financial services industry we have been polarized between annuity advocates and the brokerage industry that has been trying for a decade or so to make indexed annuities a securities product. Thanks to the new ninth wonder of the world, back-casted compounding — I am slowly moving towards the camp of making this popular product a security.

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Regulatory >>

Tony Walker
The 7 costly mistakes your clients make, Pt. 6: Leaving your cow in the wrong stall
Article posted by Tony Walker
Be sure to talk to your clients about their retirement options and whether they’re eligible for a Roth IRA. You’ll be glad you did — and your clients will most likely worry less about their retirement as a result.

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Economy >>

William Meyer
3 Social Security solutions to increase production
Article posted by William Meyer
Our whole industry is doing it wrong. A harsh critique, but spot on when it comes to Social Security planning. Agents and advisors can’t make money from it, according to conventional wisdom, so why waste your time? To ignore it is a major professional fail, for starters, but we’ll come back to that.

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