Your next LTCI sales idea: "Show me, don't tell me"Article added by Stephen Forman on April 12, 2011
Stephen D. Forman (LTCA)

Stephen Forman

Bellevue, WA

Joined: February 07, 2011

In this article, I'm going to practice what I preach and use pictures instead of words to make my point. My examples will consist of my past sales ideas for LTCI so you can see how succinctly the images summarize entire essays.

I was recently reminded that we humans are visual creatures — after all, half of the sensory neurons in our brains are devoted to vision. I learned this and much more practical information by listening to a radio interview with Dan Roam, author of "The Back of the Napkin" a chart-topping business book.

The book's title refers to the simple scribbles we make on the back of napkins and such. In other words, you needn't be a Rembrandt to successfully share your vision with others. Dan argues that stick figures are adequate!

Furthermore, just like journalism can be reduced to "who, what, when, where, why and how," Dan teaches that any concept can be illustrated with one of six visual archetypes: a portrait, chart, map, timeline, flowchart, and X/Y graph.

To prove how powerful his techniques are, I'd like to do something a bit different today. First, I'm going to practice what I preach and use pictures instead of words to make my point. Second, my examples will consist of my past sales ideas for long term care insurance so you can see how succinctly the images summarize entire essays.



In "Your next LTCI sales idea: Access" I suggested that it can be like a raffle to get into the facility of your choice while on Medicaid, and that space can be extremely limited. How much easier and more impactful would it have been to convey my argument with the image I just created above?



In "Your next LTCI sales idea: Gone with the Wind vs. Avatar" I discussed — at length — the eroding purchasing power of the dollar over time, and used as one example the price of a first-class stamp. Instead, I could have inserted the chart above which shows in dark purple how the nominal price (what we pay at the register) has risen while the inflation-adjusted price (in lavender) has held more or less constant over time.



In "Your next LTCI sales idea: That was then, this is now" (coming soon) I will be reflecting on the change in sales practices over the decades. Among the changes I've observed for better or worse is how technology has eclipsed the mild-mannered yellow legal pad and the simple, elegant drawings we agents use to use to explain policy design to our prospects. Isn't this simple?

I think there's a lot to recommend about Dan Roam's ideas, and although it's been out there for awhile, have a look! The next time you make a client presentation or have to give a talk, ask yourself whether you could substitute a simple drawing in place of a wordy exposition.

P.S. — I've got a special offer for advanced producers: On both Dan's website and within this email the alert reader will spy a marketing technique which relies on the eye. Do you see it? Message me and I'll tell you what it is!
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