Taking your marketing efforts off the playgroundArticle added by Jeffery Hoyle on May 27, 2011
Jeffery Hoyle

Jeffery Hoyle

Denver, CO

Joined: August 21, 2010

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Ladies and gentlemen, let me introduce you to the concept of tease, seize and please.

Now gather around folks. Close the office door, draw the window shades and get comfortable. We’re going to discuss a topic that public relations professionals all know about, but place it in the “don’t tell clients about” side of the list.

Taboo? Maybe — but you and your business will benefit from it in the long run.

Ladies and gentlemen, let me introduce you to the concept of tease, seize and please. Shocked yet? Probably not, because in theory the concept really isn’t that shocking. But I bet by reading my intro, I caught your attention; at least long enough to make you want to learn more. I introduce to you the first part of this magical triad: the tease.

To whet the appetite of your clients is the goal of any marketing effort. You want to give them just enough to spark the flames of interest, but not so much that the flame becomes a brush fire automatically.

But in this age of mass media, it’s more of a challenge to not just attract new clients, but to retain the clients you already have. This is where small steps come into play.

I have a new client — we’ll call them “Castle Inc.” — who is launching a new executive services business venture in a very affluent area here in town. This is the type of area where flyers on windshields are not going to make potential clients or their expensive vehicles very happy. So the key is how to create a buzz, while still protecting the areas high price tag for privacy?

In this instance, we decided to go viral … sort of. We purchased a consumer email list for this geographical area, and about six months before launch, we started a drip marketing campaign. Simple emails using imagery and verbiage that viewers would find intriguing.

An image from a beautiful veranda of a tropical sunset … two enticing fruit-derived drinks on the table … and the phrase, “Wishing you were here? Let us help,” for example.

Each subsequent email created more buzz, and here at about two weeks from launch, the buzz is out of control. The messages have done the trick; the demo we wanted to target is hooked, their appetite whet.

We have accomplished the tease.

So what happens after the tease? For Castle Inc., all things seem to be possible. Their business model states that the plan is to “create more leisure time (for our clients) one quality service at a time.” From the mundane to the fabulous, they insist that no need is too small or too large. Concierge services, travel planning, small event planning, even finding a mechanic or assisting with child care are among the countless services they provide.
If they can deliver as promised, there is no doubt they will have clients clamoring for help making their hectic lives more manageable. We have achieved the seize.

Which leads us to the final component: the please.

Like any other business, the goal is to generate income as much as possible. But in this instance, the plan is to do so by adopting a quantity as well as quality basis.

Castle Inc.’s business plan calls for a two-tiered payment system for clients. For a flat monthly or annual fee, they will cater to your every imaginable need. Or, they will bill on a service provided method. By offering two methods through which their clients can receive the same service, there is a feeling of inclusion for everyone. It places their services in the reach of almost everyone in their demographic.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how we achieve the please.

So there we have it: the tease, the seize and the please. No, it’s not rocket science, but it is an effective way of Pages:
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