​​Insurance sales: If you don’t ask, you don’t getArticle added by Matt McCann on October 23, 2012
Matt McCann

Matt McCann

Darien , IL

Joined: August 31, 2009

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“If you don’t ask, you don’t get.” — Mahatma Gandhi

In life, we want many things. But how many times do we actually ask for what we want? Generally, many of us don’t ask. We may wish, but we don’t ask.

Gandhi’s words are very simple. If you don’t ask, your chance of getting what you want is very limited. No matter what it is you want, you need to ask. How often do you ask?

Ever read interviews with top sales people? Doesn’t matter what industry they are talking about, the secret most of them will tell you is they asked for the order.

So, you asked for the appointment? Great, now are you asking for the application? Success in getting the application, assuming you did develop need and urgency, comes down to asking the right question.

Many agents ask questions which make it easier for the prospect to start the application process. Consider the questions below. You build need and urgency, you show them a few affordable options which address the concerns the prospect expressed to you and then you say:
    1. “You want to apply for long-term care insurance now, I will first need a check for xyz.”

    2. “You wouldn’t want to start the application process now, would you?”

    3. “I just need to get your doctor’s name and phone number and those prescription bottles so I have the spellings and dosages correct…”
Asking the right questions is the key in the long-term care interview. Remember, it is an interview. You are not doing a presentation. You are not telling the prospect everything you know about long-term care. You are discovering information. Then, you must actually listen to what the prospect says when answering your question. After hearing the answer, even if the answer is a good answer, you must again ask another question.
Once you have developed need and urgency, then you must go and ask for the application — not next week, not next month, but right now. Remember, underwriting is based on age and health at the time of application. The best time is now, not tomorrow. If you leave without an application, then you have left 100 percent of the problem on your prospect and their family. Now, let's review the questions once more:
    1. “You want to apply for long-term care insurance now, I will first need a check for xyz.”

    2. “You wouldn’t want to start the application process now, would you?”

    3. “I just need to get your doctor’s name and phone number and those prescription bottles so I have the spellings and dosages correct…”
The least scary of the three questions is number three. If you ask a hard question, most people will have to ponder the question. Applying for long-term care insurance is a big decision and you will usually get, “I need to think about it” as an answer.

The problem with question two is obvious: If you’re not sure, how will anyone be sure?

Question three is an easier thing for the prospect to respond to in a positive way. They understand why you are asking for this information; you hopefully talked about the timeline earlier in your interview. But in the prospect’s mind, it is easier for them to respond to in a positive way compared to question one, although the end result is the same.

Keep in mind this sales truth: If you don’t ask for the order in some way or fashion, you will tend to not get a decision. Don’t be afraid to ask.
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