Flexibility, adaptability most necessary job skills for women

By BenefitsPro


By Amanda McGrory-Dixon

Among female employees, flexibility and adaptability are the primary skills they must possess to succeed in the workplace, according to a recent survey by Randstad.

While flexibility and adaptability are cited as the most important skills by 51 percent of respondents, other important skills include knowledge of technology at 37 percent and teamwork at 35 percent.

Another 57 percent of female respondent plan to further their careers with their current employers; however, 48 percent of female respondents expect to look elsewhere when the job market improves. Even 41 percent of female respondents admit that they would greatly consideration other job offers from different employers.

Women are taking on leadership roles and advancing to the top levels of organizations faster than ever before,” says Linda Galipeau, Randstad CEO of North America. “It is, therefore, critical that companies not lose sight of what it takes to successfully identify, retain and engage high-potential women. We believe it is crucial for more executives, both men and women, to actively serve as sponsors for the next generation of female leaders. Not only is it essential for women to have access and visibility to senior executives, but it’s equally important for organizations to have a clearly defined strategy for developing women for the top roles while ensuring they are willing and able to throw their hats in the ring when the time is right.”

One of the most important engagement elements is having their efforts valued and recognized, according to 60 percent of female respondents, though only 63 percent believe this happens. Additionally, 53 percent of female respondents say one of the top commitment drivers for them is enjoying being at work every day.

To increase employee engagement, 39 percent of female respondents say promotions and bonuses are the most effective, but only 24 percent of respondents say their companies offers these.

Originally published on BenefitsPro.com