Insurance sales: Does this make sense?

By Dan Vinal

WebPrez Insurance & Annuity Videos


One of the best ways to engage a prospect is to appeal to his or her good sense. The word sense in and of itself influences the prospect's disposition, because asking the question requires the prospect to conclude for himself that the information is acceptable and apparent to anyone with good sense.

​Proven phrase can influence insurance sales

One of the best ways to psychologically engage a prospect, and help them to sell themselves, is to appeal to his or her good sense.

It's a relatively simple technique, using any variation of "does that make sense?" or "does this make good sense?"

Primer word resonates subconsciously with prospects

The word sense is the operative or critical element here.

It's what rhetorical psychologists and neurolinguistic experts refer to as a primer word. And it works because the word sense automatically resonates with a reasonable person's decision paradigm – triggering a spontaneous and subconscious emotional response, based on pragmatic or rational information. It forces the prospect to express an opinion or reach a conclusion based on obvious and reasonable information.

Key words influence key thoughts

In other words, the word sense in and of itself influences the prospect's disposition, because asking the question requires the prospect to conclude for himself that the information is acceptable and apparent to anyone with good sense. And of course, we all want to be sensible in our assessments and decisions.

If something makes sense to us, then we will readily (or sometimes reluctantly) admit it — especially if the "facts" are indisputable or undeniable. If the facts are indisputable, your prospect will agree with you, which also enhances the perception that you are credible and trustworthy.

So instead of touting the benefits and advantages of your proposition, defer to your prospects ability to reach the same conclusion that any reasonable person would reach – simply because it makes sense.

Example for auto and home coverage:

"Does it make sense to purchase your coverage based only on price — and later discover that it's a hassle to process a claim, and that it will actually cost you more money than you expected?"

Of course almost everyone will invariably agree that it does not make sense, which means they have made and expressed a conscious decision not to choose their coverage based on price.

Do you see how that works?

You don't ask them to accept your conclusion, because they know that you want to sell them something. You only ask them to accept their own conclusion (the same conclusion that any rational person would accept), so they sell themselves.

Example for fixed indexed annuities:

“Does it make sense to risk losing 30 percent, 40 percent or even 50 percent of your savings, just for the potential to capture the maximum return on your money, and then pay taxes on your earnings every year — even if those earnings can be lost after you pay the taxes?"

Example for major medical with health savings account:

"Doesn't it make sense to reduce the cost of your insurance by as much as 40 percent, pay for all your minor healthcare expenses with tax free dollars, and then keep whatever you don't spend?"

So ask yourself, "Does this make sense?"