Life >>

Julius Giarmarco
ING, DING and NING trusts
Article posted by Julius Giarmarco
An ING trust is short for “incomplete non-grantor trust”; a NING trust is short for “Nevada incomplete non-grantor trust”, and a DING trust is short for “Delaware incomplete non-grantor trust.” These are trusts where a grantor residing in a high-income tax state transfers income-generating or appreciating assets to an irrevocable non-grantor trust in a state that will not subject the trust’s income and capital gains to state income taxes (like Nevada and Delaware). In the typical ING, the grantor is a beneficiary of the trust.

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My Practice >>

Maggie Crowley
Top 3 excuses for not using a website to market your firm
Article posted by Maggie Crowley
Consider the impact a great online presence can have on your business. If your business is doing well without a website, think about how even better it could be with a website.

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Health >>

Bill Coffin
​A letter from the editor on Hobby Lobby
Article posted by Bill Coffin
Hi, everyone. Bill Coffin here. I am the Group Editorial Director of Summit’s insurance media, which includes both editions of National Underwriter, Claims, and Retirement Advisor. I also oversee our digital efforts, which are the core of our business, and which include LifeHealthPro, PropertyCasualty360 and ProducersWEB.

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Annuities >>

Jason Kestler
Income riders: Don’t be blinded by the shiny object
Article posted by Jason Kestler
We are all drawn to shiny objects in one way or another. They take many forms: a new car, a big diamond, that killer pair of shoes. In today’s annuity market, income riders are riddled with shiny objects. Let's explore them in detail.

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Retirement >>

Jared Trexler
IRS regulations create new type of retirement income annuity: The QLAC
Article posted by Jared Trexler
On July 1, 2014, the IRS released the final regulations for qualifying longevity annuity contracts. Thanks to these regulations, you will now be able to purchase certain annuity contracts that can be excluded from the fair market value you use to calculate your required minimum distribution (RMD).

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