To be original, you need to copy

By Brian Lucius

Gradient Positioning Systems, LLC


I am not talking about copying good marketing campaigns; I am talking about copywriting (writing content) great marketing campaigns. Copywriting can be one of the most difficult pieces of advertising and marketing but if you begin to practice, you'll see a shift in your practice take place you never thought possible. It's not as difficult as you think.

The Number One Reason Advisers Struggle with Marketing

Well written content can be the difference between a well spent marketing investment and a waste of marketing dollars. Advisers who master this skill could drastically increase their client acquisition. We’ll share with you the four key components to effective content.

In this article, you’ll learn…
  • Why copywriting is so important
  • How great copy will increase your appointment ratio
  • The four keys to effective copy
  • What makes your ad JUMP OUT at prospects
If you are serious about creating a unique offering, getting your advertising to the top of the pile, and converting more prospects to clients, this article below is a MUST READ!

All readers will also receive THE OPPORTUNITY to read this article AS MANY TIMES as they want!


Above is a basic structure of an advertisement. Most people are incapable of copying; therefore, they must use what others have already created.

What? I am not talking about copying good marketing campaigns; I am talking about copywriting (writing content) great marketing campaigns. Copywriting can be one of the most difficult pieces of advertising and marketing but if you begin to practice, you'll see a shift in your practice take place you never thought possible. It's not as difficult as you think.

Every business owner in the country knows they need to market and advertise. Whether it's an invite to a client event, a postcard to promote a product, or a seminar to motivate prospects, you know you need to generate activity if you want to grow. There really aren't that many methods of getting your message out to your demographic, so producing unique copy is what will put your message at the top of the reader's pile. It takes practice and a few other key components. In this article, we'll focus on copy writing for one page marketing pieces such as seminar invites, blast emails or prospecting letters.

The key components to any marketing piece are simple: attention grabbing headline, stage setting paragraph, “what you get” bullet points, optional summary paragraph and a strong call-to-action.
Let’s start with an attention grabbing headline. All you need to know is, why would someone care to read the rest of your ad? Does the headline disturb me, does it reward me or does it invoke no emotion whatsoever? The key to headlines is simple: make it short, make it count.

Next we need to set the stage and back up our headline.

The stage setting paragraph is where you will tell the reader what you are talking about and more detail on why they need your offering. You should keep this paragraph between two and four sentences. This paragraph is also a great place to cite a third-party quote or statistic to back up your big, attention-grabbing headline.

Now come the classic “what you get” bullets:
  • Use between three and five bullet points to describe the benefits of your offering
  • Tell them the what they’ll learn/get, but don’t give the answer
  • Use numbers like “Three keys” or “Seven secrets”
  • Underline and bold to show emphasis
You have an option to give a brief two to three sentence summary paragraph after the bullets. This is one more area where you can stress the importance of your offering or use it again for a third party credibility reference.

The last part is crucial and is not optional. This is your call-to-action.

A great CTA should be tangible. “Free consultation” and “free review” both sound like you are offering a “free sales call.” You need to offer something tangible like a report, whitepaper or analysis.

People are always asking “what do I get?” They are constantly weighing if their investment in a particular offer is worth the possible payout of said offer.

Your two choices on the CTA are either to offer something that they have to participate in to obtain, like a risk audit, or something they can get without even talking to you, like a “Seven Steps to a Risk Free Retirement” report. There are benefits to both and you’ll need to decide what type of outcome you are looking for on that particular advertisement.

If a prospect wanted to receive your risk audit offering, they must first meet with you and bring in their financials. This is more confrontational and maybe more effective, but are you losing the chance to talk to that prospect because they are afraid of the interaction?

One compliance tip on this style is not to call this “free” — call it complimentary. I know it sounds arbitrary but free implies that it is 100 percent free, with no costs or obligations. Your first appointment could be viewed as a “hoop to jump through” from regulators making this offer, not “free.”

The “Seven Steps to a Risk Free Retirement” report is something you could offer free. They could request this with a name, phone number and email. They run less of a chance of actually having to talk to someone or tell them no, so you may get more responses from this.

So why would you want them to get something without even talking to you? Simple, if the offer is any good, you’ll have 10 minutes of their time spent reading this report which is really more of your advertising. The question there becomes, how good is your copy on the report?

Next month I’ll cover response methods since “give us a call” is often what keeps your reader from doing exactly that.